Chinese Black Soy Milk 01

  Chinese black soy milk (黑豆漿)  

Chinese Black Soy milk 02

Talked to a friend long time ago, I was complaining about the expotentially growth of gray hair, it freaks me out, now I stop plucking them and try not to look into it so often. I do need to dye my hair more frequently than before, that’s life! Join the club as my mother and mother-in-law said to me! So my friends suggested me to eat anything that is black, namely black sesame seeds, black beans etc. One of them suggests me to make black bean and yellow soy bean milk. And after I got her recipe for a long time, I finally got the motivation to make from scratch, I don’t have a soy milk machine but it turned out that it is not that complicated or messy as all.

Thank you to my friend, Maria Leung for sharing her recipe with me.

Special equipments you need are:

  • a blender
  • a nut milk bag (I used a fish soup bag I got from Hong Kong, it works perfectly and next time I want to try the cotton diaper cloth, seems that should work as well)

Chinese Black Soy milk 03

 

 

Chinese Black Soy milk 04

 

 

Chinese Black Soy milk 05

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  Chinese Ginger & Spring Onion Lobster Egg Noodle Recipe (上湯薑蔥龍蝦燴麵)  

Living in Basel, Switzerland is not easy to find live seafood at all. So when I came across live crabs across the French border, my eyes  could not get off the water tank. Then later my friend told me that they have live lobsters when it’s season which in around this time in November, I went to check it out last year but unfortunately the water tank was ‘kaputt’ broken. So this year, a few days ago, I went to try my luck again. And I was lucky this time.

 

I have never cooked lobster before. This was my first time ever. The lobsters here are not as big as those Australian lobsters I have in Hong Kong. Here I guess mostly under 1 kg on average. The one I chose was just less than 700g and cost me about EUR 25  (1kg cost EUR 36.8)which I thought not too bad.

The Cantonese way of preparing lobster is unbeatable in my opinion. The cooking part is pretty easy I found, the challenging part was how to cut the lobster in pieces. I googled and found out the easiest way to place the lobster in the freezer for an hour or so. Then take it out, remove its head, clean up the internal parts, removed the unwanted part and cut into pieces. I am not going into details for this part as probably my vegan friends will find it cruel.

And the end results I was very delighted, Marc enjoyed it a lot especially the noodles. I guess after the first trial, I need to make again before the season ends. So here, I quickly archived the lobster egg noodle recipe for future use.

Hommard bleu 01

Hommard Bleu

Hommard bleu

Chinese steamed egg

  How to master perfect Chinese steamed eggs (蒸水蛋)  

Not sure how many of you are familiar with Chinese Steamed Eggs, but if you are Chinese, this surely will not be strange to you. Steamed eggs was one of my all time favorite childhood dishes. It is a simple and delicate dish which goes well with steamed rice and I find it suitable when you don’t have much appetite or just want something light and simple. Having said that it is simple, yet it took me a long time to master it perfectly, we have a Chinese saying “易學難精” which means easy to learn but difficult to master it perfectly.

When I was studying abroad in the UK, I needed to cook for myself. So steamed eggs came to my head, as it is supposed to be easy. Whisk eggs, add water, mix and steam, how difficult could that be?! But I failed for the first time. I asked my mom, she told me the instructions, after some time I tried again, the eggs solidified and was edible but the appearance was not smooth and pretty. Then I have not tried again for years until I came to Basel. Made occasionally, results were better but not quite consistent until these last 2 times. I don’t even need to measure the water required or sieve the egg mixture to get rid it of air bubbles as some people suggest nor I need to turn the heat from high heat to medium high. And I do not need to worry that it may be overcooked, exactly like how my mom does it. Every time I told my mom that it didn’t work perfectly, she teased me that I cannot master this simple dish. When I was in Hong Kong a few months ago in last November, she showed me that she didn’t even need to cover the plate anymore and the steamed eggs would still come out smooth with no bubbles. I suppose this is really a matter of practice, experience, and experiments with trials and errors.

So these last 2 times, with an interval of 6 months, I am able to repeat the perfect steamed eggs. I posted an iPhone photo in Facebook, unexpectedly that has generated a lot of comments and a lot of time asked me how to do it. It’s really no secret, so I take the chance to share my experience with you.

The above picture is the most basic version which contains only normal eggs.

As I grew up,  my mom has made us many other versions namely:

  • Steamed egg with salted egg (咸蛋蒸蛋)
  • Tricolor steamed eggs (三色蒸蛋) which consists of normal eggs, salted egg and thousand years egg
  • Steamed eggs with dried scallops (瑤柱蒸蛋)
  • Steamed egg with minced pork or beef (肉碎蒸蛋)
  • Steamed egg with fresh fish (魚片蒸蛋)
  • Steamed egg white (蒸蛋白), mom’s latest version, to minimize the cholesterol intake.

 

Luxury version :

  • Steamed egg white with crab leg or whole crab (花雕蛋白蒸蟹鉗), latest luxurious version. This is much more challenging, better leave the restaurants to prepare for us, haha.

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  Chinese Turnip Cake (Lo Bak Gao, 蘿蔔糕)  

Chinese Turnip Cake, Lo Pak Gao 蘿蔔糕,  is my all time favorite, you can find this all year round in Dim Sum restaurants. Yet, you can never compare with homemade ones, as they are far more tasty than the commercial ones, the ones in the restaurants usually are rather stiff and do not have enough turnips and taste too floury.

I am actually reposting this recipe, I hope to post some nicer photos. I haven’t made it for a long time. I am very happy that this is is very successful which proved this recipe truly works. Just remember the 5:1 Radish : Rice Flour ratio, the amount of stock is same as the amount of the rice flour. e.g. 350g white flour, you will need 350ml of stock. Of course, you may need to adjust the amount of flour and or liquid if necessary to get the correct consistency.

Long story cut short, as I hope to post this in time before the Year of Wood Horse arrives. I wish you all a very successful and healthy year !!!!!

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